Ethical governance of biobanking and genomic research

A/Professor Andrew Crowden1, Professor John Devereux2, Dr Julian Lamont.3

1 School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Qld 4072, Australia.
2.T.C. Beirne School of Law, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Qld 4072, Australia.
3 School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Qld 4072, Australia.

This presentation is a summary of a discussion paper that was written as part of the University of Queensland Genomics in Society: Policy and Ethics Project. The current state of ethical and legal governance of biobanking and genomic research was audited, reviewed and analysed in response to a research question that asked if Australia’s existing institutional and regulatory arrangements are sufficiently robust and flexible to account for the uncertainties and risks posed by public health genomics?  Relevant documents, frameworks, guidelines, and statements that influence and guide the ethical and legal governance of biobanks and genomic research were identified and examined. The review discovered how biobanking governance and policy has been, and is, articulated across different jurisdictions and policy categories, with reference to international, national, state and territory, and local health service levels. The project included consideration of culturally appropriate guidelines developed by Indigenous peoples, including Maori and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders.  A clear picture of the biobank governance policy environment in Australia will be outlined and a preferred practical ethical governance framework will be identified and defended.


Biography

A/Prof Andrew Crowden is at the School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry, University of Queensland.